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Updated On: Thursday, 15 November 2018
Development Issues
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South Sudan Crisis, Detrimental Impact of Israeli Occupation, Among Texts Adopted as Economic and Social Council Concludes Coordination, Management Meeting

Content by: UN General Assembly

The Economic and Social Council adopted 13 resolutions and 12 decisions on issues ranging from Haiti’s long-term development, to the economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation, to non-governmental organizations and regional cooperation, as it concluded its 2018 Coordination and Management meetings today.

The Council’s two previous rounds — during which it reviewed the reports of its subsidiary and expert bodies, and considered special country or regional situations — were held from 16 to 18 April and from 12 to 14 June and 2 to 3 July.

In a recorded vote of 45 in favour to 2 against (Canada, United States), with 2 abstentions (Cameroon, Rwanda), the Council adopted a resolution titled “Economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan”.

Tarik Alami, Director of the Emerging and Conflict-Related Issues Section, United Nations Economic Commission for Western Asia, who introduced the related report by the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA), said that the ongoing cycles of violence will not end and peace will not be attained until the root causes of the conflict are addressed.  The detrimental effect of more than 50 years of occupation is multi-layered and has far-reaching impacts on the Palestinian population.

Egypt’s delegate introduced the draft resolution, stressing that the Israeli occupation continues to deepen the economic and social hardships of the Syrian and Palestinian people.  Israel’s illegal policies have deplorable effects on the living conditions of the Palestinian people, he said, adding that Israel’s practices in the occupied Syrian Golan resulted in the Syrian people experiencing restrictions in accessing natural resources and social services.

Speaking before the vote, the representative of the United States said that her delegation was disappointed by the one-sided and biased resolution.  Such a text only served to inflame both sides of the conflict and complicated the shared goal of a lasting and comprehensive peace between the Israelis and Palestinians.  Instead of blaming Israel, ESCWA should be looking at Hamas.

Israel’s representative took the floor after the vote, expressing disappointment in the Council’s actions, emphasizing that the resolution was another example of the anti-Israel bias exemplified across the United Nations.

The observer for the State of Palestine said that the resolution was not “anti-Israel”, but rather was “anti-colonialism”.  He said that a path to peace existed, but it could not be travelled due to the continued violation of international law.

In a related action, the Council rejected a proposed amendment to the resolution that called for the immediate release of the civilians and soldiers being held in Gaza by Hamas.  That amendment was rejected by a recorded vote of 18 against to 5 in favour (Canada, Colombia, Mexico, United States, Mexico), with 23 abstentions.

In its decision on African countries emerging from conflict, the Council took note of the Secretary-General’s report on the implementation of integrated, coherent and coordinated United Nations support to South Sudan, requesting that a report be submitted at the organ’s 2019 session.

Adnan Khan, United Nations Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator and World Food Programme (WFP) Country Director in South Sudan, said that the humanitarian situation in the African nation continues to worsen, while protection threats continue to escalate in scale and scope.  The destruction of schools has had a severe impact on access to education, while the current economic situation remains challenging.  Health issues are also of concern.

Turning to coordination issues, the Council adopted a text extending the mandate of the Ad Hoc Advisory Group on Haiti until the end of the 2019 session, in order to provide advice on the country’s long-term development strategy.

Marc-André Blanchard, Chair of the Ad Hoc Advisory Group, introduced its report, highlighting that more than a year after the conclusion of the elections and establishment of a new Government, important steps have been taken for Haiti to make tangible progress on the path towards development.

“Haiti has an opportunity to undertake a real transition from a dynamic of humanitarian assistance to one of truly sustainable development,” he said, although the situation remains fragile as the country continues to be confronted with socioeconomic development challenges.

Ronald Tran Ba Huy, United Nations Resident Coordinator and World Food Programme Representative in Haiti, said that the country faces a significant fiscal deficit for 2018, although planned Government investment in the agriculture sector and normal rainfall led to an above‑average harvest, with increased agricultural output.

The Organization continues to support the normalization and implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals in Haiti, he said, while the transition to a non‑peacekeeping United Nations presence will constitute a defining moment in terms of development and stability in the country.  A security transition plan is currently being developed, while humanitarian actors continue to help build State disaster‑preparedness capacity.

Meanwhile, Haiti’s representative underscored the need for a renewed partnership framework which will allow the country to “catch up” through a substantial increase in national production, improved public infrastructure and increased foreign investment.

In other action today, the Council adopted resolutions related to non‑governmental organizations; regional cooperation; the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2011-2020; the Committee for Development Policy on its twentieth session; science and technology for development; international cooperation in tax matters; geospatial information; coordination, programme and other questions; and the calendar of conferences and meetings in the economic, social and related fields.

The Council also took up issues related to elections, nominations, confirmations and appointments on its subsidiary bodies.

The Economic and Social Council will reconvene on Thursday, 26 July to elect the Bureau of its 2019 session.

African Countries Emerging from Conflict

ION JINGA (Romania), Chair of the Peacebuilding Commission, recalled that, since its creation in 2005, it has served as an intergovernmental advisory body in support of conflict-affected countries.  Over the past few years, the Commission has convened many country- and regional-specific meetings, he said, highlighting that its work primarily focuses on African countries.  The Sahel remains a clear priority for the Commission’s work, particularly regarding its efforts to advance the United Nations integrated strategy for the Sahel.  To enhance greater synergies in the region, the Commission’s annual session will focus exclusively on the Sahel.  Stressing that national ownership and leadership are essential for the success of peacebuilding efforts, he underlined that the responsibility for sustaining peace is broadly shared among all national stakeholders.  Today’s challenges often have a cross boarder nature, he said, emphasizing that it is critical to consider the economic and development aspects of peacebuilding, while also taking into consideration the gender perspective.

ADNAN KHAN, United Nations Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator and World Food Programme (WFP) Country Director in South Sudan, speaking via video link from Juba, introduced the report of the Secretary-General titled “Implementation of integrated, coherent and coordinated support to South Sudan by the United Nations system” (document E/2018/70).  He said that, during the reporting period, the humanitarian situation in South Sudan continued to worsen, while protection threats continued to escalate in scale and scope.  The destruction of schools has had a severe impact on access to education, while the current economic situation remains challenging.  Health issues, including deaths from malaria and vaccine‑preventable illnesses, continue to be of concern.

Acting without a vote, the Council then adopted a decision titled “African countries emerging from conflict” (document E/2018/L.24).

Long-Term Programme of Support for Haiti

MARC-ANDRÉ BLANCHARD, Chair of the Ad Hoc Advisory Group on Haiti, introduced its report (document E/2018/75) and the draft resolution contained therein (document E/2018/L.18).  He said that, more than a year after the conclusion of the elections and establishment of a new Government, important steps have been taken for Haiti to make tangible progress on the path towards development.  “Haiti has an opportunity to undertake a real transition from a dynamic of humanitarian assistance to one of truly sustainable development,” he said, although the situation remains fragile as the country continues to be confronted with challenges that affect its socioeconomic development.  The Group encourages the Government to assume the full leadership and ownership of its national development and to undertake urgent reforms in key areas, such as the justice sector to reinforce its governance institutions.

RONALD TRAN BA HUY, United Nations Resident Coordinator and World Food Programme Representative in Haiti, briefing via videoconference from Port-au-Prince, said that the country faces a significant fiscal deficit for 2018.  However, planned Government investment in the agriculture sector and normal rainfall led to an above‑average harvest, with increased agricultural output.  The United Nations continues to support the normalization and implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals there, while the transition to a non-peacekeeping United Nations presence will constitute a defining moment in terms of development and stability in Haiti.  A security transition plan is currently being developed, while humanitarian actors continue to help build State disaster preparedness capacity.

The representative of Haiti said that since its creation, the Ad Hoc Advisory Group has taken its mandate seriously; continuously examining the challenges faced by the people of Haiti and progress made on those issues, while also assessing the country’s persistent fragility and vulnerability.  It has also provided relevant recommendations that could provide new impetus for national development efforts.  Yet, he stressed that the enhancement of public investment in essential infrastructure and the corresponding economic growth were yet to come.  The Group should contribute to a renewed partnership framework which will allow the country to “catch up” through a substantial increase in national production, improved public infrastructure and increased foreign investment.

The representative of El Salvador underscored the need for the international community to support Haiti in its efforts aimed at recovery, reconstruction and economic stability.  The clear commitment of the Haiti Government is important to achieve progress and should be based on a long-term strategy and vision.  He stressed the importance of continued support to the country’s people, in line with national development priorities.

The Council then adopted the resolution, titled “Ad Hoc Advisory Group on Haiti”.

Economic and Social Repercussions of the Israeli Occupation

TARIK ALAMI, Director of the Emerging and Conflict Related Issues Division, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA), introduced the note of the Secretary-General on the economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation (document E/2018/69).  He said that Palestinians continue to suffer from discriminatory Israeli practices.  In violation of international law and standards, the Israeli military continues to use force against the Palestinians, who also suffer from attacks by Israeli settlers.  The demolition of Palestinian homes and structures contributes to a coercive environment in the West Bank.  More than 80 per cent of those in Gaza rely on humanitarian aid, he said, and the poverty rate there continues to increase.  The detrimental effect of more than 50 years of occupation is multi-layered and has far-reaching impacts on the Palestinian population.  Cycles of violence will not end and peace will not be attained until the root causes of the conflict are addressed.

The representative of Syria said that Israel is pursuing illegal and discriminatory practices in the Golan.  Israel is attempting to “get rid of the Syrian people’s identity” by imposing Israeli citizenship.  Israeli efforts to organize elections in four towns in the Golan are a flagrant violation of the relevant Security Council resolutions.

The representative of Israel expressed disappointment in the content of the report, which she said contains false and inaccurate information.  There are many examples of cooperation between Israel and the Palestinians, yet those examples are excluded.  The report blames Israelis for the challenges faced by the Palestinians, yet there is no mention of Hamas, which is a terrorist regime that denies the Palestinians their basic human rights.

The observer for the State of Palestine stressed that nothing could compensate for a State colonizing the lands of others and preventing the people there from living in dignity.  Israel has sought to undermine the contiguity of the Palestinian lands and has overtaken the natural resources found there — actions which make the Israeli occupation illegal.  Israeli policies are designed to allow for settlements to flourish at the expense of a Palestinian State.

The representative of Egypt then introduced the draft resolution titled “Economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan” (document E/2018/L.19).  He said that the Israeli occupation continues to deepen the economic and social hardships of the Syrian and Palestinian people.  Israel’s illegal policies have deplorable effects on the living conditions of the Palestinian people, he said, adding that Israel’s practices in the occupied Syrian Golan resulted in the Syrian people experiencing restrictions in accessing natural resources and social services.

He then provided an oral amendment to operative paragraph 14 of the resolution.

The representative of the United States said her delegation objected to the Council’s consideration of the oral amendment provided by the representative of Egypt, stressing that, per the rules, all amendments must be circulated to the Council in advance.  It would be hard to imagine the chaos that would erupt if the basic rules of the Council were flouted in such a fashion, and in that connection, she stressed that consideration of the amendment would undermine the integrity of the working methods of the Council.

The representative of Algeria, speaking on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, asked for clarification on the voting procedure.  The Chair then responded to that request.

The observer for the State of Palestine said that the amendment stemmed from the desire of countries to reach a compromise.  The amendment was meant to be a means of preserving multilateralism and promoting mutual respect.

The representative of Israel said that the amendment fell far short of addressing the real issues on the ground, particularly as it failed to condemn and acknowledge the actions of Hamas.

The Council then voted to consider the revision to the draft resolution by a recorded vote of 40 in favour to 1 against (United States), with 5 abstentions (Canada, India, Japan, Republic of Korea, Rwanda).

The representative of Spain, speaking on behalf of the European Union, provided clarification on the bloc’s understanding of some of the terms contained within the resolution, including the terms “Palestine” and “forced displacement”, among others.

The Council then turned to an amendment (document E/2018/L.27) to the draft resolution titled “Economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan”.

The representative of Israel then introduced the amendment (document E/2018/L.27), stressing that the resolution served no other purpose than to unfairly target his country.  The resolution makes no mention of the crimes committed by Hamas, which rules Gaza by an “iron fist”.  He proposed an amendment to operative paragraph 13 of the resolution.

Speaking before the vote, the observer for the State of Palestine said that Israel continues to withhold the bodies of Palestinians, which calls into question Israel’s credibility.

The representative of the United States said the resolution makes no mention of the actions of Hamas, which did nothing to better the lives of the Palestinian people.  At the very least, the Council should hold Hamas accountable for holding prisoners.  All Member States should be clear about where they stand on Hamas.

By a recorded vote of 18 against to 5 in favour (Canada, Colombia, Mexico, United States, Mexico), with 23 abstentions, the Council rejected resolution L.27.

The Council then turned to draft resolution L.19, as orally revised.

Speaking before the vote, the representative of the United States said her delegation was disappointed by the one-sided and biased resolution.  Such a text served to inflame both sides of the conflict and complicated the shared goal of a lasting and comprehensive peace between the Israelis and Palestinians.  Instead of blaming Israel, ESCWA should be looking at the primary culprit — Hamas.

The Council then adopted draft resolution L.19, as orally revised, by a recorded vote of 45 in favour to 2 against (Canada, United States), with 2 abstentions (Cameroon, Rwanda).

Speaking after the vote, the representative of the Russian Federation noted that his delegation voted in favour of the resolution, although it abstained from the amendment proposed by Israel.

The representative of the Philippines said his country is opposed to provocations and delays in resolving the conflict, stressing that bloodshed could not be recouped with more bloodshed.  A lasting solution cannot be imposed from the outside, but rather a working solution must be reached between the two parties.

The observer for the State of Palestine said that the resolution was not “anti-Israel”, but rather was “anti-colonialism”.  There is a path to peace, but that path cannot be travelled given the continued violation of international law.

The representative of Israel said it is disappointing that the Council failed to adopt the amendment proposed by her delegation.  The resolution was another example of the anti-Israel bias exemplified across the United Nations.

The representative of Uruguay said the resolution shows that there is a problem that needs attention given the grave needs of the Palestinian population.

The representative of Sudan noted that his delegation voted in favour of the resolution, based on the right of the Palestinian people to a viable State, with East Jerusalem as its capital.

The Council then took note of the Secretary-General’s report on assistance to the Palestinian people (document E/2018/72).

Non-governmental Organizations

The Council then turned to a draft decision titled “Application of the non‑governmental organization Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung e.V. for consultative status with the Economic and Social Council”, contained in the report of the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations on its 2018 resumed session (document E/2018/L.29).

The representative of the United Kingdom, associating himself with the European Union, said that non-governmental organizations have much to contribute to the work of the United Nations.  He expressed concern about the possibility of reprisals being carried out against non-governmental organizations for attending United Nations activities and stressed that the participation of such groups should be encouraged and enabled.  It was evident that the Committee on Non‑Governmental Organizations needs to work in a more efficient manner.  He was dismayed to have to highlight the blatant discrimination being faced by those organizations that have a human rights focus from gaining accreditation in a timely manner.

Introducing the draft decision, the representative of Germany said during its more than 60 years of work, Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung has demonstrated that it is fully committed to the United Nations Charter.  The organization is established in all regions of the world, and focuses particularly on civic education and sustainable development.

The representative of the Russian Federation said his delegation has always supported the work of the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations.  The majority of the members of the Council did not have all the necessary information regarding Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, and in that connection, the organ could not give its own balanced assessment of the application.  His delegation requested that additional time be given to review the organization’s application.

He then made a motion under the terms of rule 50 of the rules of procedure that no action be taken on the draft decision.

The representative of China recalled that, in recent years, some countries have been pushing the Economic and Social Council to overrule the recommendations of the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations.  He expressed support for the motion put forward by the Russian Federation.

The representative of Germany expressed firm opposition to the motion put forward by the Russian Federation, stressing that the organization has been open to and diligently answered all questions posed by the Committee.

The representative of Venezuela expressed concern about the tendency of the Economic and Social Council to fail to accept the recommendations presented by its subsidiary bodies.

The representative of the United States said the organization is well-known and highly regarded and would make substantial contributions to the Council’s work.  As a matter of principle, her delegation is opposed to non-action motions, particularly as they sought to take advantage of the rules of procedures.

The Council then proceeded to a vote on the motion proposed by the representative of the Russian Federation.

By a recorded vote of 27 against to 10 in favour, with 7 abstentions (Algeria, Benin, Ecuador, Iraq, Lebanon, Turkey, United Arab Emirates), the Council then rejected the no-action motion.

The representative of Czechia, speaking on behalf of the European Union, noted that Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung in January 2017 opened an office in New York with a view towards supporting the work of the United Nations on a variety of important issues.  The organization fulfils all the requirements for accreditation, he said, underscoring that all applications should be considered in a transparent manner, without delay.

The representative of Cuba expressed concern that Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung has declared its interest in working against a Member State of the United Nations, which is a clear violation of the criteria required for organizations to be granted consultative status.

The representative of the United States said it was unfortunate that the Council had to vote on the application of an organization that clearly meets the criteria for consultative status.  It is regrettable that Member States whose hostility towards civil society is well-known continue to block the applications of such groups.

The Council then adopted the decision by a recorded vote of 28 in favour to 8 against (China, Philippines, Russian Federation, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, South Africa, Sudan, Venezuela, Viet Nam), with 11 abstentions.

Speaking after the vote, the representative of Viet Nam reaffirmed her delegation’s respect for the working methods of the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations.  Although Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung has been working in her country for many years, she expressed regret that many of the Committee members’ legitimate questions and concerns have gone unanswered.

The representative of Rwanda said that civil society has an important role to play in the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals.  She stressed that non‑governmental organizations must remain focused on economic and social development.

The Council then turned to Chapter I of the report of the Committee on Non‑Governmental Organizations on its 2018 resumed session, (document E/2018/32 Part II), adopting the eight decisions contained therein.

Regional Cooperation

The Council next took up the Secretary-General’s report and related addendum on regional cooperation in the economic, social and related fields (documents E/2018/15 and E/2018/15/Add.1).

AMR NOUR, Director of the Regional Commissions’ New York Office, introduced the Secretary-General’s report and addendum, underlining that the former highlights the central role of the regional commissions in the pursuit of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  The first part of the report shows how the assets and core functions of the regional commissions are leveraged in an integrated manner to support the efforts of Member States, and the second part covers developments in selected areas of regional and interregional cooperation, including policy matters addressed and efforts to promote coherence at the regional level.

The representative of El Salvador said that, when it comes to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda, experiences varied across regions.  He noted that, when the reports of the Regional Commissions were presented at the recent High-Level Political Forum, there was no time provided for discussion or debate.

Mr. NOUR said that the guiding principle of the work of the Regional Commissions is how to direct and support Member States in their pursuit of the 2030 Agenda.

The representative of Chile expressed concern about the possible reduction of staff in the regional commissions.

The Council then adopted, without a vote, the five recommendations contained within the report and corresponding addendum.

The Council also took up the summaries of the surveys of regional, economic and social conditions prepared by the Regional Commissions (documents E/2018/16, E/2018/17, E/2018/18, E/2018/19 and E/2018/20).

Programme of Action for Least Developed Countries for Decade 2011-2020

The Council then adopted the resolution titled “Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2011–2020” (document E/2018/L.26) without a vote.

Speaking after the adoption, the representative of the United States said that her delegation recognized the 2030 Agenda as a global framework for sustainable development, but offered points of clarification regarding some of the language contained within the resolution.

Sustainable Development

The Council then adopted a resolution titled “Report of the Committee for Development Policy on its twentieth session” (document E/2018/L.22) without a vote.

Speaking after the adoption, the representative of Japan said that his delegation had carefully examined the language contained within the resolution, particularly regarding the graduation of States from the least developed countries category.  He noted that recommendations for graduation for several States were deferred in the resolution.

The representative of the United States expressed concern that requests for extensions for graduation are becoming more common.  He underscored that the preponderance of extensions reduces the credibility of the Council and discourages meaningful development policy.

The representative of the Solomon Islands, speaking on behalf of the Pacific Island Forum Group, said that, when a country graduates from least developed status, it needs to enact a large number and range of new policies and sometimes legislative changes to remain globally competitive.  The metrics used to judge readiness for graduation are fragile, he stressed, adding that the resolution for the countries of the Forum is bittersweet.

The representative of Bhutan said her country is committed to graduation and hoped to do so in a manner that is irreversible.  “This is a defining moment for Bhutan,” she said, although, as a small landlocked developing country, her nation continues to face daunting challenges.

Science and Technology for Development

PLÁCIDO GÓMEZ RAMÍREZ, Deputy Minister for Science and Technology of the Dominican Republic and Chair of the twenty-first session of the Commission on Science and Technology for Development, introduced the body’s report on its most recent session (document E/2018/31).  During the session, participants stressed that, when used appropriately, science, technology and innovation could serve to promote sustainable and resilient societies.  Speakers also reaffirmed the vision of the World Summit, namely the creation of an information society, centred on people.

DONG WU, Chief of Science Technology Innovation Policy, Division on Technology and Logistics, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), introduced the report of the Secretary-General on progress made in the implementation of and follow-up to the World Summit on the Information Society at the regional and international levels (document E/2018/10).  She said that use and access to information and communications technology has been steadily increasing, although access to the Internet is far from being universal.  Digital divides also exist within countries, she said, while the digital gender gap is also of concern.

The Council then adopted the two resolutions and one draft decision contained within the session report.

International Cooperation in Tax Matters

The Council then took note of the report of the Committee of Experts on International Cooperation in Tax Matters on its sixteenth session (document E/2018/45.Add.1), and adopted the decision contained within that report.

Geospatial Information

The Council then adopted the resolution titled “Rules of procedure of the United Nations Group of Experts on Geographical Names and draft agenda of its first session” (document E/2018/L.25).

Coordination, Programme and Other Questions

Next, the Council turned to the annual overview report of the United Nations System Chief Executives Board for Coordination for 2017 (document E/2018/48) and the report of the Committee for Programme and Coordination on its fifty-eighth session (document A/73/16).

The representative of Belarus said the recent Committee session focused on improving working methods.  Among positive outcomes of the session, participants reflected on comprehensive approaches to middle-income countries and the effectiveness of the work of the United Nations Secretariat in its work with States.  The next session of the Committee will be fundamental in terms of United Nations system reform and in modernizing working methods.  He highlighted the need to support such work.

The representative of the United States said that in the context of innovation, his delegation recognizes technology transfers only when they are voluntary and on mutually agreed terms.  It does not support references to such transfers in the draft text and will continue to oppose language undermining intellectual property rights.  Moreover, reinterpretations of the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) independent mandate are unacceptable to his delegation.

The Council then took note of both reports.

Calendar of Conference and Meetings in Economic, Social and Related Fields

Acting without a vote, the Council adopted a resolution titled “Calendar of conferences and meetings in the economic, social and related fields” (document E/2018/L.21).

Elections, Nominations, Confirmations and Appointments

The Council then approved the nomination of 24 experts to serve on the Committee for Development Policy for a three-year term beginning on 1 January 2019.  The list of experts appears in document E/2018/9/Add.15.

Next, the Council elected Oman and Turkey from the Asia-Pacific States and the Western European and Other States, to the Commission on Science and Technology for Development for a term beginning on 1 January 2019 and expiring on 31 December 2022.  The Council also postponed the election of one member from the African States and three members from the Latin American and Caribbean States.

In its next action, the Council elected Lemus de Vásquez as a member of the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights for a term beginning on 1 January 2019 and expiring on 31 December 2022.  It postponed the election of one member from the Asia-Pacific States for a four-year term beginning on 1 January 2019.

The Council also elected Liberia to the Committee for the United Nations Population Award for a term beginning on 1 January 2019 and expiring on 31 December 2021.  It postponed the election of two members from the African States, three members from the Asia-Pacific States, one member from the Eastern European States, two members from the Latin American and Caribbean States and one member from the Western European and Other States for a three-year term beginning on 1 January 2019.

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